Forget nostalgia, these analog artists are looking to the future

Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 08:02:29 AM. Why, in this age of digital production, do some artists elect to make or release their work on analog platforms?
Photo: Vanessa Berry says writing on a typewriter is far more physical than using a computer. (ABC RN: Teresa Tan) Searching through old vinyls and tattered first editions has long been a tradition for the savvy bargain hunter and discerning obscurist. Now it's more popular than ever. Record sales are at a two-decade high, typewriters have a growing fanbase and classic film cameras are being reissued. So why, in this age of widely accessible and user friendly digital production, do some artists elect to make or release their work on analog platforms? While the trend is often characterised as "hipster" and reactionary, the regrowth of analog art is read by some as a deeper consideration of how we, as human beings, might more successfully integrate with the quickly digitising world around us. A nurturing experience Vanessa Berry, a nonfiction writer, memoirist and sometime-zine maker based in Sydney, considers the analog revival a natural response to the screen-lit lives we lead. "People are attracted to analog things because they spend so much time on computers, on their phones, looking at screens," she says. "To actually have a break from that feels like something that is special and nurturing." Berry has always been an advocate of the analog, the manual and the vintage. "I was a teenager in the 1990s, and that was sort of the bridge time between the analog way and the more digital way," she says. "I've always retained that analog part of me, I think, because I like...Read more
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