Learning to accept my daughter's obsession with Disney princesses

Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 06:01:40 AM. I was most concerned that she'd base her self-worth on her looks, which wouldn't boost her self-esteem.
Once upon a time there was a little girl whose passion for pink was so intense that she steamrolled her princess-averse parents and ushered in a period of tulle and tiaras that would have been unimaginable just a few years earlier. It was so over the top that Cinderella might have pretended to hurl. But this story has no ending - at least not yet. For a time I (the mother in this fairy tale) worried it would end badly. I imagined that the princess obsession was a prelude to my daughter, Mari, becoming superficial. I feared that as an adult she'd be easy prey for glittery marketing campaigns coaxing her to spend her hard-earned cash on lipstick and face creams and increasingly invasive methods of body hair removal. I was most concerned that she'd base her self-worth on her looks, which wouldn't boost her self-esteem. Mari's proclivity for pink isn't unique. Across America and beyond, legions of these little princesses shun gender-neutral clothing. They overwhelm their parents with requests for princess merchandise, including ostentatious and outlandish accessories. And they insist on wearing their finest frocks on the most ordinary of outings. "Wait - I need my crown and cape," Mari would say as we left the house for errands. We'd rummage through the toys until we located her royal gear - a cardboard crown she'd made in preschool that she wore until it disintegrated, and a colorful scarf she'd fashioned into a cape. Thus adorned, she was a popular sight at our local pharmacy....Read more
Share this

You might also like

Similar