SpaceX warns of sonic boom after next launch in Florida

Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 02:47:14 PM. A mission planned for SpaceX will include a landing on the coast, which could result in a loud 'boom'

SpaceX has issued a warning that its upcoming mission will include a return to a land-based platform, which should result in a sonic boom.

A two-hour launch window for the company, which plans to launch a secretive spacecraft known only as Zuma, will open at 8 p.m. Wednesday.

Zuma will take off aboard the company’s workhorse Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center on Florida’s Space Coast.

The company will try to land the Falcon 9 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Landing Zone 1.

If successful, it would mark the eighth time the company will have landed at Landing Zone 1.

“There is the possibility that residents of Brevard, Orange, Osceola, Seminole and Volusia counties may hear one or more sonic booms during the landing attempt,” an advisory read. “Residents of Brevard County are most likely to hear a sonic boom, although what residents’ experience will depend on weather conditions and other factors.”

The advisory explained that a sonic boom happens when a vehicle overhead travels faster than the speed of sound.

Industry publications have reported that the Zuma mission was added in mid-October but few details have been discovered.

Northrop Grumman is the payload provider, according to Popular Mechanics.

Got a news tip? msantana@orlandosentinel.com or 407-420-5256; Twitter, @marcosantana

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