First look: Ophthalmologists learn about advances in care at meeting this week in New Orleans

Tuesday, 14 November 2017, 11:16:47 PM. As eye doctors from around the world converge this week on New Orleans for the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s annual meeting, expect to see revelations including dry-eye cures, eye drops
As eye doctors from around the world converge this week on New Orleans for the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s annual meeting, expect to see revelations including dry-eye cures, eye drops inspired by the tissue of sharks and the latest in high-tech surgery. A talk was scheduled Sunday by New Orleans native and pianist extraordinaire Henry Butler, blind since birth as a result of glaucoma. Butler has not had even the slightest perception of light since he was 3 months old due to the disease, which causes high intra-ocular pressure and damages the nerve connecting the eye to the brain. Yet “limitation” is not a word in his vocabulary. “I decided early on while at The Louisiana School for the Blind that I was going to take advantage of the help that was offered me in order to attain my goals, and music was decidedly my way out,” Butler said last week from his home in Brooklyn. Many cases of congenital glaucoma are now treatable surgically, but that was not the case in 1949, when Butler was born. The Academy asked him to speak so he could recount what it was like to grow up without one of the critical five senses. Treatment for non-congenital glaucoma, which strikes later in life, has also advanced over the years, and the most recently approved FDA drug for reducing the pressure of open-angle glaucoma is being discussed at this year’s meeting. “We’re discussing new molecules, new chemical entities, different from their predecessors, and now in clinical development,” said Gary...Read more
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