Korean BBQ Meets Classic Chophouse at Cote

Thursday, 14 September 2017, 04:08:58 AM. Although New Yorkers can now choose to start their day eating “high vibration” vegetables from world-renowned chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten, and end it scarfing down tofu...
Although New Yorkers can now choose to start their day eating “high vibration” vegetables from world-renowned chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten, and end it scarfing down tofu skin “cheesesteaks” after getting sloshed at a vegan bar backed by Moby, the city is still, resolutely, a steakhouse town. Peter Luger and Keens remain eternally busy, and newfangled stalwarts like the Strip House and Wolfgang’s seem to proliferate like rabbits. Contemporary standouts, like M. Wells Steakhouse, the Bowery Meat Company, and the tiny, purposely exclusive 4 Charles Prime Rib, have found favor expanding on time-honored traditions without challenging them too much. So now your rib eye could come with pastrami seasoning, or your crème brûlée might be served in a marrow bone. We’ve even attracted steakhouses with cult followings from other countries, like France’s Le Relais de Venise L’Entrecôte and Ikinari, Japan’s famous standing steakhouse. The seemingly endless crop of newcomers isn’t letting up, either: This fall, more than a handful of charred hopefuls hit the scene, each with a different take on the genre. Decade after tallow-slicked decade, as tastes and diets have changed, the steakhouse has endured. Shtick, though, can only take you so far, and too many modern attempts at carnivorous reinvention fall flat. Not so with modern Korean cooking, which — thanks to restaurants like Oiji and Atoboy that mine home cooking for fine-dining inspiration, and the K-Town and Flushing outposts of...Read more
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