Editorial: Participation in government makes the process work

Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 02:53:17 PM. A common refrain is that government can be inaccessible, even at the local level, making it difficult for the average citizen who works during regular business hours to offer input on the goings-on of their communities.
A common refrain is that government can be inaccessible, even at the local level, making it difficult for the average citizen who works during regular business hours to offer input on the goings-on of their communities. Sometimes, we think that’s true. For example, it’s not particularly easy for residents with normal hours to attend a Board of County Commissioners meeting at 1:30 p.m. on a Thursday, a 9 a.m. county planning and zoning meeting on a Tuesday, or even a 5 p.m. school board meeting on a Wednesday. Still, we see examples all the time of boards, councils and individual elected officials conducting night meetings to solicit feedback from community members, often on issues that should be hot topics, only to see sparse attendance. Take Monday’s series of open forums to solicit community feedback in the search for the next superintendent of Carroll County Public Schools to follow a retiring Stephen Guthrie next year. Input collected at these meetings was to be presented to and used by the Board of Education to develop a brochure and advertisement to solicit to candidates for the open superintendent position. Emily Chappell Few turned out Monday night to give feedback about what Carroll’s next school system superintendent should be like, the first step in a months-long process to find a replacement for exiting Carroll County Public Schools Superintendent Stephen Guthrie. Six forums were held throughout the county... Few turned out Monday night to give feedback about...Read more
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