Trump-induced fears of nuclear war? That's normal, psychologists say

Friday, 11 August 2017, 04:18:08 PM. After U.S. President Donald Trump's avowal to unleash 'fire and fury' on North Korea, psychologists say feeling fearful or anxious about the threat of a nuclear holocaust or any life-altering catastrophe is perfectly normal.
TORONTO -- U.S. President Donald Trump's avowal to unleash "fire and fury" on North Korea in response to any military strikes against the U.S. has raised the spectre of a nuclear confrontation between the countries, ratcheting up public anxiety about the potential for such a devastating event. While the escalating rhetoric may be mere sabre rattling, psychologists say feeling fearful or anxious about the threat of a nuclear holocaust or any life-altering catastrophe is perfectly normal. "Sometimes we might experience a sense of being in constant danger, especially if we're questioning if there's this threat to life and safety," said Dr. Katy Kamkar, a clinical psychologist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto. "And it becomes not only the concern for the safety of self, but then of course for the safely of loved ones, the destruction of everything we have established," she said. "The uncertainty can induce more worry. We feel more vulnerable and it can lead to feeling more helpless and powerless." Shmuel Lissek, founding director of the ANGST Laboratory at the University of Minnesota, said humans have been hard-wired to err on the side of caution. From an evolution perspective, organisms that were overly cautious in the face of low-probability threats were more likely to survive and pass on their genes -- and humans inherited those genes, Lissek told the Washington Post this week. "So when there's a very small-probability threat that is of very high...Read more
Share this

You might also like

Similar