Grace Notes: Bill Cassidy steps up as other Senate Republicans struggle with Roy Moore candidacy

Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 12:10:48 AM. In my Sunday column, I wrote about how a majority of Louisianans in 1991 found a line they would not cross and elected a deeply flawed Democrat, Edwin Edwards, over
In my Sunday column, I wrote about how a majority of Louisianans in 1991 found a line they would not cross and elected a deeply flawed Democrat, Edwin Edwards, over a much more flawed Republican, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, as governor. Where, I wondered, was the line for national Republicans today, with disgraced judge and now accused child-molester Roy Moore on the ballot for U.S. Senate in Alabama? Stephanie Grace: In Duke-Edwards race, Louisiana drew the line; where's Alabama's line with Roy Moore? In today's sharply divided politics, contests for the United States Senate tend to be much m… Back then, national Republicans were adamant in their rejection of Duke as a representative of their party. Now, with the party struggling to pass any legislation at all and its slim Senate majority threatened, reaction has been more muddled. Yes, most of Moore's possible future colleagues have voiced distress and said the allegations are disqualifying if true. But only a few have said the well-sourced accounts published last week in the Washington Post, including one centered on his alleged contact with a 14-year-old when he was a 32-year-old assistant district attorney, are enough to keep him from office. Moore has denied that particular accusation, although he didn't dispute that he'd dated girls as young as 16. So, good for Louisiana U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy for being one of the first. Cassidy kept his condemnation short and to the point. He took to Twitter over the...Read more
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