Mike Pride: The ongoing perversion of the Second Amendment

Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 12:45:39 AM. One morning in the late summer of 1949, a World War II veteran named Howard B. Unruh walked down the 3200 block of River Street in Camden, N.J. – his block – blowing away his neighbors with a Luger. In 12 minutes he killed 13 people and wounded three...
One morning in the late summer of 1949, a World War II veteran named Howard B. Unruh walked down the 3200 block of River Street in Camden, N.J. – his block – blowing away his neighbors with a Luger. In 12 minutes he killed 13 people and wounded three others. The victims included a new bride, nine other adults and three children. After Unruh was caught, Mike Berger, the reporter who covered the story for the New York Times, managed to get a look at Unruh’s room. He described it carefully, knowing his readers would want to sift through the details looking for anything that might explain the massacre. “On the peeling walls,” the reporter wrote, “he had crossed pistols, crossed German bayonets, pictures of armored artillery in action. Scattered about the chamber were machetes, a Roy Rogers pistol, ashtrays made of German shells, clips of 30-30 cartridges for rifle use and a host of varied war souvenirs.” Although Unruh liked to shoot, neighbors described him as a soft-spoken and mild man who regularly read the Bible. A story much later in Smithsonian magazine described a distressing habit he had developed while fighting in Europe. Each time he killed a German, he made notes listing the time and place. Sometimes he described the corpse. Possibly it provides some comfort to know that senseless mass killings have been a fixture in American life for a long time. But think of the novelty for people in 1949 trying to figure out who Unruh was, why he went on a rampage, why it appealed...Read more
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