Our Views: Veterans, many of who become influential leaders in the country, deserve our thanks

Monday, 13 November 2017, 10:59:43 AM. In a nation plagued by political division, it is right and good that Americans continue to find common cause in two holidays remembering those who’ve served in the country’s armed
In a nation plagued by political division, it is right and good that Americans continue to find common cause in two holidays remembering those who’ve served in the country’s armed forces: Memorial Day, which commemorates fallen warriors, and Veterans Day, which honors those former soldiers, sailors and air personnel who still walk among us. Today’s observance of Veterans Day is usually an occasion to look backward, touched by reflection on the services rendered by members of the military before they returned to civilian life. But it’s also important to remember the continuing contributions that veterans make to civic life long after they’ve retired their uniforms. Since the United States was founded, the military has been one of our most promising laboratories of leadership. Those skills of command can be enormously useful beyond the armed forces, as the history of this country makes clear. Veterans have harnessed their experiences of service in civic, business and political life, enormously enriching the intellectual capital of the nation. U.S. Sen. John McCain of Arizona would not be the leader he is if not for his military career, nor would retired Gen. John Kelly, the White House chief of staff, be able to lead without the insights he gleaned in uniform. The role of the Army in shaping Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards is another case in point. Revived by younger veterans, a New Orleans VFW has a revamped home, expanded mission Any superpower called to quiet a dangerous...Read more
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