Stephanie Grace: In Duke-Edwards race, Louisiana drew the line; where's Alabama's line with Roy Moore?

Monday, 13 November 2017, 11:00:14 AM. In today's sharply divided politics, contests for the United States Senate tend to be much more about which party voters prefer than which candidate is most admirable.
In today's sharply divided politics, contests for the United States Senate tend to be much more about which party voters prefer than which candidate is most admirable. Case in point: Republican David Vitter easily won reelection in 2010, three years after revelations of his contacts with a Washington, DC prostitution ring, by casting himself as the one thing standing between Louisiana and Democratic President Barack Obama. And even before last week's shocking, well-sourced Washington Post exposé alleging that Alabama U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore had initiated sexual encounters with teenage girls as young as 14, handicappers have been wondering whether Alabama would follow suit.  If Louisiana tilts red in national elections, Alabama is about as Republican as states come. The seat Moore hopes to claim was previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who was considered a rightward outlier on many issues even among fellow Republicans but who attracted no opposition the last time he was on the ballot. +2 Stephanie Grace: Why U.S. will look like Louisiana, circa 1991 More and more, this year’s unpredictable presidential race is starting to resemble one of Lo… Moore, the former Alabama Supreme Court justice who beat President Donald Trump's endorsed candidate in a knock-down, drag-out GOP primary, has long been a notoriously controversial figure. He was removed from the court for defying federal orders to remove a massive Ten Commandments monument, got elected again, then...Read more
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