Fearing funding loss, colleges' rush to judgment in sex assault cases can ruin young men's lives

Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 04:31:19 AM. Having represented more than 100 male students on college campuses across the country, in both blue states and red states, I have seen firsthand how wrongfully accused male students are being unfairly punished, with no opportunity to defend themselves.
By Andrew Miltenberg Recently, former Vice President Joe Biden spoke at Rutgers University as part of the "It's On Us" campaign to prevent sexual violence on campus. In addressing more than 2,000 students on the New Brunswick campus, Biden criticized the Trump Administration and U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos for revisiting Title IX policies for sexual assault investigations on campus. While Joe Biden's campaign to end sexual assault is commendable, it's also important to recognize the deeply flawed Title IX policies for sexual misconduct investigations on college campuses. Unfortunately, the Obama administration's policies on campus sexual assault have created an inequitable process for sexual misconduct investigations -- as well as an inherent male gender bias -- at colleges and universities throughout the country. One sexual assault is too many, and so is one wrongfully expelled male student. Having represented more than 100 male students on college campuses across the country, in both blue states and red states, I have seen firsthand how wrongfully accused male students are being unfairly punished, with no opportunity to defend themselves. In 2011, the Obama administration issued a policy directive known as the "Dear Colleague" letter to every college and university receiving federal funding, addressing their obligation under Title IX to respond to claims of sexual harassment and sexual violence. While the Obama administration was right to insist that more...Read more
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